Will Vinegar Turn Hydrangeas Blue?

In alkaline soil, hydrangea blossoms will be pink; in acidic soil, they will turn blue.

If great French wine is not properly stored, it will turn into vinagre, which we translated into vinegar in English. Vinagre is a combination of the Old French words “vin” (wine) and “aigre” (sour).

There are certain advantages to using vinegar in gardening, especially apple cider vinegar. A few vitamins and minerals are present in apple cider vinegar because it is only fermented apple juice. However, vinegar’s 5% acidity makes it an excellent remedy for any acid-loving plants, including rhododendrons, azaleas, northern bayberries (Myrica pensylvanica), blueberries, and cranberries. Conifers and pecans are two examples of trees that favor acidic soil.

Along with feeding your garden plants, you may use apple cider vinegar on houseplants that prefer acidic soil, such gardenias and camellias. Some houseplants thrive in acidic soil.

You must measure the pH of your soil before fertilizing it or adding any amendments. The soil pH test determines how acidic or alkaline the soil is.

A very acidic pH of 3 corresponds to a very alkaline pH of 10. Seven is regarded as the neutral pH. Your soil’s acidity or alkalinity has an impact on a number of chemical processes, including which nutrients are locked up in the soil and which nutrients are available to your plants.

There are several garden plants that do well in acidic soil, despite the fact that the ideal pH range for most plants is between 5.5 and 7.5. It is not surprising that many plants that thrive near pine trees, such as blueberries, azaleas, and rhododendrons, also prefer acidic soil because pine needles make soil acidic.

The best apple cider vinegar to put on plants is raw, organic apple cider vinegar that hasn’t been filtered. Ensure “with the mother” is written on the label.

The mother is a brown mass that is composed of yeast and bacteria that were left behind during fermentation.

Apple cider vinegar should never be poured directly over plants since it will damage them. Of course, undiluted vinegar will work well if your purpose is to kill plants like weeds in walkways, sidewalks, or driveways.

Use apple cider vinegar diluted with water (20 parts water to 1 part vinegar). Water the plants at the base of them. The vinegar-and-water mixture might burn the leaves, so try to avoid getting it on them.

The ability to transform the color of hydrangea blossoms from pink to blue is another trick apple cider vinegar has up its sleeve. In alkaline soil, hydrangea blossoms will be pink; in acidic soil, they will turn blue.

Give the acid-loving plants a treat by combining apple cider vinegar and water. Or abruptly switch the hue of your hydrangeas from pink to blue. Oh, and what about pearls dissolved in vinegar?

Pearls were dissolved in vinegar and consumed by Cleopatra to display her wealth, likely making the acidic beverage the most expensive beverage ever. Speaking of bittersweet.

Paul Barbano, who lives at Rehoboth Beach, writes about gardening there. You can write to him at PO Box 213 in Lewes, Delaware 19958.

How can vinegar be used on hydrangeas?

Although vinegar has a place in the home, does the garden need it as well? In order to alter the color of the blooms on bigleaf hydrangeas (Hydrangea macrophylla), some gardeners have begun using vinegar to lower the pH of their soil. Does this really function? The simple answer is, sort of; theoretically, it could. But is it the most effective long-term remedy for changing the pH of your soil? Here’s why we don’t believe it!

A Quick Chemistry Lesson

Did you know that the bloom color of hydrangeas isn’t directly influenced by the pH of the soil? It becomes a little trickier than that! In reality, bloom pigments are reliant on the presence of aluminum ions (Al+) in the soil. Aluminum ions react with hydroxide ions (OH-) in basic soils (pH > 7.5) to generate Al(OH)3, which is stationary in the soil and unavailable to plants. However, these aluminum ions are no longer bound by hydroxide and are free to mix with other ions when the soil becomes more acidic (pH lower than 6.5). Other ions, particularly those that plants absorb, will react with it. Aluminum is now “mobile” and available for plant uptake as a result. Hydrangea blossoms turn blue as they absorb more aluminum ions. Bigleaf hydrangeas can produce pink or blue flowers depending on whether the soil is acidic or basic.

While increasing the mobility of aluminum in your soil will alter the color of your blooms, it can also be harmful to your plants. A poisonous soil can have a pH that is too low. The plant may even perish if there is too much aluminum in the soil. To make sure you are not reducing the pH too much, make sure you test your soil frequently.

What does this have to do with vinegar?

Water and 5% acetic acid combine to form vinegar, an acidic liquid. Since home vinegar has a pH of about 2.4, it is neutral at a pH of 7. (which is quite acidic). According to the hypothesis, adding weak vinegar to the soil will cause the pH to decrease sufficiently to alter the color of your hydrangea blossoms. The soil will become more acidic thanks to this tactic, but only temporarily.

Do we consider this to be a viable option? Not really, no. If it rains or is watered, the vinegar will quickly dissolve in the soil and have little effect on pH. Additionally, hydrangeas require a pH adjustment that is sustained over a lengthy period of time in order to change color. It might require more time than a single growing season! To keep the pH stable, you would need to add vinegar to the soil each time you water.

The greatest option for your plant or the surrounding wildlife may not be this one. You may have heard that vinegar can be used to destroy weeds. Any leafy green tissue that vinegar is sprayed on will be destroyed because the acetic acid in vinegar can quickly burn through the wax layer on leaves. When sprayed directly to the soil, the vinegar doesn’t hurt the roots. Pests like fungus gnats will be attracted to the vinegar’s pungent fragrance, while wildlife will be deterred from making your garden their home. Even worms and other significant soil creatures that are advantageous to your garden can be discouraged by it!

What are the alternatives?

Personally, we don’t advocate changing the pH of your soil because we believe hydrangea blossoms are lovely in every color. In the garden, a pH change can have a variety of effects, including making the soil unsuitable for neighboring plants. If you’re set on changing your bloom color, we advise using ground lime to raise pH levels or garden sulfur or ammonium sulfate to drop pH levels. Consider planting your shrub in a sizable pot because doing so is simplest in a container.

How can I organically dye my hydrangeas blue?

The chemistry of the soil, not what is sprayed to the blooms, is what determines how colored hydrangea blossoms turn out to be. The color of the blossoms will increase with soil alkalinity. Some types stay pink at a neutral pH, while others begin to display exquisite lavender hues with undertones of blue. Acidic soils, usually with a pH of 5.5 or less, are ideal for blue hydrangea blooming.

Aluminum sulfate, which is readily accessible at practically any garden center, is the simplest way to acidify your soil and turn those babies blue. In the spring, as soon as the plant starts to grow, saturate the soil around your hydrangeas with a solution of 1/4 oz. aluminum sulfate in a gallon of water. Reapply in 4 weeks and again in 8 weeks because you’ll need to keep that acidity throughout the growing season.

Another, more organic way to increase soil acidity is to add organic materials like coffee grounds, egg shells, or citrus fruit peels. Simply break them up and till the soil with them. It can take a full year of doing this continuously for the changes to occur gradually, resulting in the proper acidity.

How do I dye the blossoms on my hydrangeas blue?

Although most plants may grow in a variety of soils, others require particular kinds of soil to thrive. Rhododendrons, azaleas, and other ericaceous plants require acidic soils in order to thrive. The soil in your garden must be acidic if they flourish there or in the gardens nearby. Rhododendron leaves turning yellow or disappearing from the area indicate that your soil is likely alkaline. In addition to affecting what you may grow, your soil type can also affect some plants’ leaf and blossom colors; hydrangeas are a well-known example.

Some hydrangea cultivars grow pink or red in alkaline soil and blue or purple in acidic soil. Therefore, if you plant a beautiful blue lacecap or mophead hydrangea in your garden and your soil is neutral to acidic, it will continue to produce blue flowers every year. Even if it was clear blue when you got it, it will flower purple-red or pink if you plant it in alkaline soil the next year.

It is challenging to keep beautiful blue blossoms alive in the open ground, but it is doable if you grow it in a pot; hydrangeas make wonderful topics for pots and containers. Select a pot that is attractive and big, at least 40 cm (15 cm) in diameter. Vitax Ericaceous Compost is the best growing medium for it; plant it there. If you consistently feed your hydrangea, it will thrive on this fertilizer that is specifically made for rhododendrons, azaleas, and other lime-hating plants.

Even though the growing medium begins out being free of lime, repeated watering in places with hard water tends to make it more alkaline. Therefore, add Vitax Hydrangea Colourant, a powder containing aluminum that you may mix with the compost, to ensure that your hydrangea stays truly blue. Each spring, you can also incorporate a small amount into the soil’s top layer and add it to the can when watering your plant.

White hydrangeas, incidentally, don’t change color depending on the type of soil, but they can blush pink in the light.

Feeding and watering

In pots, containers, and during dry spells in the open ground, regular watering is necessary since hydrangeas detest dry environments. When you plant your hydrangea in a bed or border, add lots of garden compost or farmyard manure, and make sure to water well both before and after planting.

The presence of food in the soil is necessary for hydrangeas to grow and produce flowers, even if they are not very demanding plants. In the open ground and in pots and containers, Vitax Conifer and Shrub Fertilizer should be used annually. This is ideal for acid-loving plants and won’t change the hydrangea’s color.

Can you dye hydrangeas blue with baking soda?

One of the simple “tricks” that many people use to alter the color of their flowers is this one. This is what? Your hydrangeas’ color and appearance will change if you sprinkle some baking soda in the soil around them.

Are hydrangeas turned blue by epsom salt?

A: I’ve been considering the idea of using Epsom salts to intensify the blue hue of hydrangeas. I would like to attempt this as I have an old box of Epsom salts, but the term “salt” raised a cautionary signal. What percentage should I use?

A bitter salty spring in Epsom, England, where the water includes magnesium sulfate in solution, is where the name “Epsom salt” originates.

The term “salt” in chemistry simply refers to the outcome of an acid-base reaction. By combining sodium hydroxide and hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride (table salt) is created. The reaction between sulfuric acid and magnesium metal produces epsom salt.

Some salts, such as salt cod or Virginia ham, are particularly hydrophilic; they dry and preserve the materials they are placed with. Epsom salt does not absorb water from its surroundings since it is already hydrated.

The pH of the soil is left unchanged by the dissociation of the ions in Epsom salt. Since the metal that gives hydrangeas their blue hue is only present in acidic soil, adding Epsom salt won’t modify the color of your blossoms. Two tablespoons of alum (aluminum sulfate), which is acidifying, would have the desired impact on each plant.